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Wednesday, February 11, 2009

5 Nobel laureates at the Science Conclave, IIIT-A


On the second day of the Science Conclave 2008, at IIIT-A, five Nobel laureates dealt with the importance of fundamental science. They together formed an interesting spectrum. The audience was spellbound.

CJ: Arindam Roy , 16 Dec 2008 Views:1623 Comments:1


NOBEL LAUREATE Harold (Harry) Walter Kroto, began his short speech, at the second day’s inauguration ceremony, at the Science Conclave 2008, thus, “I will repeat what Henry VIII told his wife, before slaying her: I won’t keep you very long…”

He was speaking at the Indian Institute of Information Technology-Allahabad (IIIT-A), on Tuesday (Dec 16) afternoon.

Prof Kroto from UK, told the august gathering, “You brought us some good food, some good restaurants. Competition is unhealthy and counterproductive in science. Do sciences because you enjoy it, just as you might enjoy sports…I only hope England wins for a change.”

Nobel laureate Prof Claude Cohen Tannoudji remarked, “It’s fantastic to spend a week here amongst fellow scientists and students. Despite violence and hate, it’s nice to see scientists come together to promote science and culture.”

Another Nobel laureate Martin Lewis Perl, an American physicist, from California, lauded tremendous contribution that India has made to the US in general and California, from where he hailed, in particular. “It has brought the wonderful Indian dance, art and culture along with science.

There is a collaboration in science and culture between the US and India,” he said.

American physicist Jerome Issac Friedman, awarded Nobel Prize, in 1990, noted that the Conclave brought the brightest and best students together to discuss science and interact. “It’s up to the new generation to carry forward the tradition of science. In addition to great technology, we need great basic science. We should have true knowledge to support technology,” he said.

He cited the example of the discovery of transistor. He said that those responsible for its discovery had very good knowledge of quantum mechanics. He confessed that he enjoyed the decision to become a scientist. The students too would enjoy it.

Prof Slavnov Andrei Alekseevich, reminded the audience that the future of science does not only depend on the government but also on them. He smiled and added, “It doesn’t matter if you get a Nobel Prize or not.”

(http://www.merinews.com/catFull.jsp?articleID=153226)

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